Adrian Pearsall vintage furniture
A classic coffee table designed by Adrian Pearsall
A classic coffee table designed by Adrian Pearsall
adrian-pearsall-coffee-table

Adrian Pearsall vintage furniture is original mid-20th century furniture produced by the American designer Adrian Pearsall.

Background

Adrian Pearsall (1925 – 2011) was an architectural engineer and furniture designer who created some of the most influential styles of the 1950s and 60s.

After training as an architect, he established the company Craft Associates in 1952 and produced a highly popular line of affordable designer furniture in the American mid-century ‘Atomic’ style.

The company found huge success due to Pearsall’s unique but affordable designs, and was eventually sold to the Lane Company in 1969. He continued to design for the company until it ceased production in the 1970s, and later founded the new company Comfort Designs with John Graham.

Pearsall spent the later years of his life restoring and racing old yachts, whilst offering his time and services to numerous charitable causes. In 2008 he was nominated for induction into the Furniture Hall of Fame.

Guide for collectors

The majority of Adrian Pearsall furniture was produced by his company Craft Associates in Kingston, Pennsylvania, with earlier designs produced by his first company Davison-Pearsall, based in Ashville, North Carolina.

The most sought-after items are those made by Craft Associates during the 1950s and 60s, when Pearsall made his reputation with a series of iconic designs. He is perhaps best known for his various lounge chairs, sofas and coffee tables, which incorporated walnut and unusual, colourful fabrics.

Due to the obvious influence on his designs by his mentor Vladimir Kagan, many of his pieces are misidentified or mis-sold as Kagan furniture as this often guarantees them a higher price. However, many collectors of Kagan’s furniture are now looking at Pearsall’s work as a less expensive alternative, with many believing his furniture is undervalued.

Because Pearsall produced such a wide variety of designs, many of them remain un-catalogued although the interest amongst collectors is growing. Pearsall’s family is currently undertaking a project to catalogue his designs, and the current listing can be found on their website.

Price guide

The most valuable pieces of Adrian Pearsall furniture sold at auction tend to be his lounge chairs, often sold in pairs, his Gondola sofas or his glass and walnut coffee tables. Other popular items include his long, low-slung sofas with built-in tables on each side, and his sculpted walnut rocking chairs.

Sofas can sell for anything from $500 to more than $5,000, depending on the specific design and the upholstery fabric. Coffee tables can bring up to $1,000, with just the wooden frames themselves sometimes selling for several hundred dollars.

Pairs of high-backed lounge chairs can sell for up to $5,000, with individual chairs or lounge chair-ottoman sets often fetching $1,000 - $2,000.

See also

Main article: List of notable furniture designers
Main article: Mid Century Modern furniture
Main article: List of types of chair
Main article: Vladimir Kagan Furniture

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