Hugh King’s militaria collection
Hugh King’s militaria collection consisted of a large number of military badges.

Hugh King

'Head-dress Badges of the British Army by Hugh King and Arthur Kipling'
'Head-dress Badges of the British Army by Hugh King and Arthur Kipling'
hugh-king-book

Hugh King (1921-2006) was a “world-renowned militaria collector” and author.1

He volunteered for the Royal Air Force, quickly ascending to the rank of Corporal. He served in Canada for several years.

King later worked as a hairdresser for retired Officers and began collecting badges around this time.

He was universally known for his badge collection. In 1978, he co-authored Head-dress Badges of the British Army with Arthur Kipling, the ‘bible’ for badge collectors.

The collection

'BM70 6th Keith V.B. Gordon Hldrs. cap badge'
'BM70 6th Keith V.B. Gordon Hldrs. cap badge'
bm70-hugh-king-badge

King collected military badges for over 50 years. The collection, the largest in the world,2 contained several notable badges, detailed below:

  • 91st (Princess Louise’s Argyllshire) Highlanders Officer’s shako plate, circa 1872-81: described as “an extremely fine and rare example in copper gilt and silver, a Thistle pattern star with raised central strap”, with an estimated value of £500 - £600.
  • 21st (Royal North British Fusiliers) Regiment Officer’s glengarry badge, circa 1874-77: It is described as “a superb example in copper gilt and silver”. It has an estimated value of £700 - £900.
  • BM70 6th Keith V.B. Gordon Hldrs. cap badge: It is described as a “super example of this very rare badge” with a value of £325.3
  • BM69 5th V.B. Argyll & Sutherland Hldrs. glengarry badge: It is described as “a rare genuine example circa 1887-1908” and “the real deal”, and has a value of £325.

See also

Main article: list of notable militaria collectors

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